You are browsing the archive for 2000 January.

by bloc

Project Officer: Northern Bloc

12:00 am in Projects by bloc

Date: Deadline:Monday 13th June, midday. Postal or electronic applications will be accepted. Electronic applications need to be sent by midday on the day of deadline. Interviews Monday 20th June 2005.
Partner: Conwy County Borough Council | www.conwy.gov.uk
Partner: |

Bloc is looking for a Project Officer to assist in establishing a Northern Bloc in Conwy County, North Wales.

Salary Scale: £120 per day VAT inclusive. Working 38 days (equivalent to 1.5 day a week) over 6 months beginning in July ’05. The project officer will be based at the Business Centre, Llandudno Junction, Conwy. The post holder will need to be available from July ’05.

Outline:

Qualification and Experience: The appointed person will have experience in organising activities and events. An informed approach to the Creative Industries and New Media in Wales is essential. The ability to speak Welsh is desirable. The post holder will be experienced in using PC computers using XP and databasing. The applicant will need to have access to private transport to carryout out some of the duties required of this post.

Aims and Objectives: As a pan-Wales organisation, Bloc’s development strategy is to establish four bases in North, South, East and West Wales in order to successfully address need across Wales. The appointed Project Officer: Northern Bloc would identify, and bring together at professional events, individuals and clusters from the creative industries working with new technology specifically in Conwy County, North Wales. The project will attract professionals in the region including neighbouring counties: Anglesey, Denbighshire, Flintshire, Gwynedd and Wrexham.

All applicants need to apply for the post with a CV and covering letter addressing the particular points of experience outlined in the job specification. To download further information on the post including job specification and background information….

Area: northern bloc

by bloc

YOU MAY FUND – a creative technology award open to artists based in Wales

12:00 am in Festivals by bloc

Date: Deadline: Monday May 30th 2005. Shortlisted artists will be notified by Wednesday 2nd June and interviewed on Monday 6th June 2005 in Cardiff.
Partner: The festival is being developed between bloc and Chapter. |
Partner: |

The YOU MAY FUND enables artists based in Wales to complete and present works to be shown at MAY YOU LIVE IN INTERESTING TIMES, Cardiff festival of creative technology ´ 28th to 30th October 2005. The fund is open to all artists, or group of artists, living and working in Wales.

Outline:

MAY YOU LIVE IN INTERESTING TIMES is Cardiff’s inaugural festival of creative technology – a three-day programme of events being held across the capital. The festival is being developed between bloc and Chapter.

Festival theme: Artists are increasingly engaged with or inspired by digital technology – exploring consumer and communication technologies such as the worldwide web, mobile networks, file sharing, and computer gaming. Because digital technology is a participatory medium with global reach, artists tend to explore digital technology in the context of public and shared spheres. Often digital art is situated somewhere between public art – albeit in a dematerialised form – and street culture where the technology itself is used as a ‘site’ for the production and presentation of art works. Although digital technology is often claimed to go beyond physical limitations, engagement with technology is always embedded in, or grounded in, real spaces and places whether this is explored from a user or network perspective.

YOU MAY FUND: A one-off contribution of up to £1,000 per application to support the production and presentation of work/or artist fee for works that address the festival theme. The festival will consider funding up to £2,500 in exceptional circumstances. If you are considering applying for more than £1,000, please contact the festival prior to application: youmayfund@mayyouliveininterestingtimes.org

All applicants need to submit an outline and budget breakdown on the form provided and visual material (CD-ROM, URL, video/DVD, slides). To download the form please see below. The festival will cover the cost of travelling to interview.

The festival You May Fund is supported by the Arts Council of Wales, Cardiff 2005 and the Millennium Commission.

Area: all wales

by bloc

Sound

12:00 am in Seminars by bloc

Date: December 1998
Venue:Chapter Arts Centre
Partner: Chapter Arts Centre |
Partner: |

This meeting concentrated on the art of sound

Outline:

Fine art works increasingly involve a multidisciplinary approach including sound and interaction. This meeting explored sound as an additional dimension in the visual arts, the composition of sound by an audience, and the possibilities sound offers in attracting alternative audiences to galleries as well as enabling the fine arts alternative exhibiting venues. Finally this meeting addressed whether multi disciplined work enables collaboration between discrete cultures.

Contributors:

Helen Sloane | Curator, writer, and researcher.

Andre Ktori | AudioRom
http://www.audiorom.com
Jon Bedworth |

|

by bloc

Scary Y2K

12:00 am in Seminars by bloc

Date: December 1999
Venue:Chapter Arts Centre
Partner: Chapter Arts Centre |
Partner: |

This seminar will focus on our human capacity for prophecy

Outline:

In the 50`s when mainframe computers were first programmed and memory was costly, programmers were encouraged to save memory by expressing years in two digits rather than four. Now with the approaching year 2000 some computers will find it difficult to distinguish between 1900 and 2000. To confuse matters the millennium year is also a leap year.

Although YK2 has been `scary` for a number of years it has been relentlessly ignored. The human race rarely looks beyond the initial benefit of innovations, something the environmentalists among others have been warning for some time.

The bug reminds us of how interdependent present society is on digital technology, a very recent relationship of reliance. Irrespective of whether ones own computer is `Millennium Compliant` there is no guaranteed protection against the web of computers servicing our homes, communities, and businesses. The anticipated millennium bug highlights some characteristics of present society as well as ascribes to a long history of human foreboding.

Human kind has always prophetised impending doom. Has the Y2K embraced the age old human need for lore, a bit of adversity and the chance to begin again? Or will it be added to the list of other premonitions, such as the apocalypse, which soon become myths. Or does this harbinger call into question our present relationship to Christianity? – the year 2000 being Jesus`s birthday.

The soothsayers of this seminar will offer some practical advice for protecting our homes, community, and work against the bug. However, the seminar will focus on our human capacity for prophecy, and ask: Is the bug a flaw in thinking and a wakeup call, a flux that will shift the course of human kind by encouraging long term considerations OR if we sustain access to our computer when the gong strikes twelve will we wipe our brows and and return to our blinkered ways?

Contributors:

Paul Swann | National co-ordinator of the Y2K Community Action Network

Peter Russell | Writer and editor of an independent, annual journal `Fourth Door Review`, an interdisciplinary green cultural journal

Michael Punt | Artist and writer

|

by bloc

Print and Publishing

12:00 am in Seminars by bloc

Date: October 1998
Venue:Chapter Arts Centre
Partner: Chapter Arts Centre |
Partner: |

This meeting explored the important role print has had in forming knowledge and disseminating information.

Outline:

Its reproductive qualities challenge have always challenge the singular fine art work. The current ability to `publish` work on the world wide web extends the notion of duplication as well as offering artists an alternative to the validating powers of publishing houses and galleries. This meeting asked: How is art work effected by digital technology? Is print threatened by the world wide web? Does digital publication affect quality in its form and content?

Contributors:

Jim Noble | Artist based in Liverpool

Tim Long | Artist

Sarah Goodey | Creative media designer at Sequence a Cardiff based Internet development company.

|

by bloc

Transforming Identities

12:00 am in Seminars by bloc

Date: October 1999
Venue:Chapter Arts Centre
Partner: Chapter Arts Centre |
Partner: |

This seminar will explore the possibilities for transforming our existing identities through new technology.

Outline:

Following the presentations there will be a chaired discussion open to the contributors and the audience. Digital technology is claimed to blur the boundaries between self and simulated identities. It offers numerous ways of disguising or substituting `real` identity such as name, address, or persona. Many digital techniques, computer games or virtual worlds, offer an extension to play or `recreation` and touch on the apparent human need to pretend, imitate, multiply, or temporarily withdraw from oneself through representative identities.

How do new forms of technology transform identities? Are these transformations a welcome release from the self? Do they encourage an identity crisis and with it a diminished sense of responsibility OR do they offer a freedom to subvert or transcend aspects of self or group identity such as gender or race?

Contributors:

Ted Polhemus | (USA) author, anthropologist, photographer

Nicola Green | (NZ) Digital World Research Centre, Surrey University

http://www.surrey.ac.uk/dwrc/
Richard Pierre-Davis | 4 Real
www.mongrel.org.uk
|

by bloc

Technological Determinism

12:00 am in Seminars by bloc

Date: September 1998
Venue:Chapter Arts Centre
Partner: Chapter Arts Centre |
Partner: |

This meeting explored the belief that society and culture are determined by technology.

Outline:

There are various and often conflicting theories as to what influences technological change. Technological determinism is sometimes argued to be an autonomous entity which forces society to adapt to it. Others theories cite economic, political, or ideological forces to affect technological change. This meeting asked: Does technological determinism exist? If so what forces technological change? Does technology influence the fine arts and design?

Contributors:

Michael Punt | Michael Punt is a writer and artist.

John Langrish | Dean of the Institute of Advanced Studies at Manchester Metropolitan University

Kevin Edge | Lecturer in design history at UWIC

|

by bloc

Site-specific Bloc: The Real and the Virtual

12:00 am in Seminars by bloc

Date: July 1998
Venue:Chapter Arts Centre
Partner: Chapter Arts Centre |
Partner: |

Site-specific Bloc explored alternatives to the fixed, static or monumental sculptures that are often associated with public, site related art works. Via the internet new multi- site relationships are now possible.

Outline:

This meeting discussed alternative notions of `site`, asking how does new technology feed into and challenge past site-specific assumptions and concepts. Site-specific Bloc also discussed the changing social relations that the internet generates.

Contributors:

Wiard Sterk | Commissions Officer at Cardiff Bay Arts Trust

Avon Huxor | Senior Research Fellow from the Centre for Electronic Arts at Middlesex University

Michael Punt | Lecturer at the University of Wales College, Newport where he is the Director of Postgraduate Studies (Art and Design) and an associate of the Centre for Advanced Inquiry into Interactive Art (CAiiA).

|

by bloc

Bio-bloc: Science in Arts

12:00 am in Seminars by bloc

Date: June 1998
Venue:Chapter Arts Centre
Partner: Chapter Arts Centre | www.chapter.org
Partner: |

This meeting addressed the rapid advances in scientific technologies and explored whether the arts, and more specifically installation related work, can supply a critical commentary on developments in biotechnology.

Outline:

This meeting aims to address issues such as: What are the effects of scientific and historical documentation and research on the fine arts? Can art only be a parasite in relation to science? Can artists avoid the impact of science/technology on their work and Should they? Why is science an expanding area within art practice? How does art stand in relation to the moral and political consequences of science?

Contributors:

Simon Robertshaw | Artist based in Liverpool

Dr. Royden Hunt | Organising Tutor in philosophy-related studies at the Department of Continuing Education, University of Cardiff.

Dr. Clive Cazeaux | Lecturer in Philosophy at UWIC

|

by bloc

Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Machines

12:00 am in Seminars by bloc

Date: May 1998
Venue:Chapter Arts Centre
Partner: Chapter`s Visual Arts and Digital Arts Programme | www.chapter.org
Partner: |

This meeting will explore the latest in both CAD software and CAM hardware.

Outline:

The debate will aim to address a number of issues: Is this method of production available and financially viable for `one off` art works?
How does the `hands off` of production processes effect the creative process? Can computer aided machines be employed as a tool in computer aided design, reversing the CAD/CAM process?